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24 Bales Performance Horses


Training From Start to Finish Youth and All Levels of Non Pro Riders


Now Accepting Open, Futurity, and Derby Horses


Trainer, Marty Bales 760-885-7897 Located at


Anaheim Hills Saddle Club


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Facing Fire


Hoping wildfires will leave us alone isn’t enough; preparedness is our best bet to protect our horses


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hat does it mean to prepare for a disas- ter? Preparedness is


important for all animals, but it takes extra consideration for horses because of their size and the requirements for transport- ing them. If you think that disas- ters happen only if you live in a floodplain, near an earthquake fault line, or in a coastal area, you may be tragically mistaken. Disasters can happen anywhere and include barn fires, hazard- ous materials spills, propane line explosions, and train derail- ments, all of which may necessi- tate evacuation. It is imperative that you are prepared to move your horses to a safe area. During an emergency, the


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time you have to evacuate your horses will be limited. With an effective emergency plan, you may have enough time to move your horses to safety. If you are unprepared or wait until the last minute to evacuate, you could be told by emergency management officials that you must leave your horses behind. Once you leave your property, you have no way of knowing how long you will be kept out of the area. If leſt behind, your horses could be unatended for days without care, food, or water. To help you avoid this situation, here is some information and suggestions to help you plan for emergencies.


Post emergency telephone num- bers at each telephone and at each entrance.


Emergency telephone num- bers should include those of the barn manager, veterinarian, emergency response, and other qualified horse handlers. Also keep your barn’s street address clearly posted to relay to the 911 operator or your community’s emergency services. Be sure your address and the entrance to your property are clearly visible from the main road.


Consider installing smoke alarms and heat detectors throughout the barn. New heat sensors can detect


rapidly changing temperatures in your barn. The heat sensors should be hooked up to sirens that will quickly alert you and your neighbors to a possible barn fire.


Host an open house for emergency services personnel. Familiarize them with the


layout of your property. Provide them with tips on horse han- dling or present a miniseminar with hands-on training for horse handling.


Familiarize your horses with emer- gency procedures. “Desensitizing” training is


more popular than ever. Why not train your horse to accept common activities they would encounter during a disas- ter—flashlights, flashing lights. Trailering is critical—it is very important that your horses are comfortable being loaded onto a


893767-1904A


886515-1907A


90


906712- 70 06712


12-1702A


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